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Staff Performance Data Series: Breakfast of Champions

Posted on  5 April 11  by 

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CCC conducted a frontline staff skills survey as part of our major research initiative for this year.  As you can imagine, not every interesting data point makes its way into the final product.  Take a look at what got left on the ‘cutting room floor’ in the first of three posts.

I’ve been told my whole life how eating breakfast is such an important part of the day.  As a child, I couldn’t leave the house for school until I had eaten a hearty meal, presumably because my performance throughout the day would be impacted.  Is this idea really true or did the world pull a fast one on me?  I think it’s probably true, but here at CCC we uncovered some data that might horrify parents out there…

Taking a step back to provide some context, every year CCC develops a survey to guide our major research for the year.  This year we developed a frontline staff skills survey to better understand what drives today’s rep performance.  Within that survey there are mostly questions that address the core aspects of rep work activity, but some are thrown in there to test impact from external forces, such as whether or not reps eat a full breakfast.

As it turned out, none of the external forces proved significant in our analyses, but the data taken from the “cutting room floor” is still interesting:

  • 35.2% of high performers do eat a full breakfast,  but another 31% of high performers do not eat a full breakfast.

What this data shows is that there is a very even distribution of high performers and their breakfast eating habits, leading me to believe that breakfast might not be as important as we’re led to believe, at least not for people handling customer service issues.  Caffeine on the other hand, appears to be less of a habit for high performers (surprising, right?):

  • Only 25.1% of high performers do rely on caffeine to get through the day, while 42.3% of high performers do not rely on caffeine to get through the day.

Perhaps the most important thing for reps to consider before work is not whether they’ve eaten a hearty breakfast, but rather whether or not they’ve had a morning cup of coffee.  Performance obviously depends on many factors, so it’s not likely that breakfast and coffee have a huge impact on their own, but it certainly could be part of it.  I may think twice about my multiple cups of coffee a day!

Now I’m not actually advocating for you to change your morning routine based on this data.  My main purpose of highlighting these items is to provide some interesting descriptive data that is up for interpretation.  To learn about what didn’t reach the cutting room floor, you can reference our latest results from this survey.

And just for fun, let’s take a moment to see how common these habits are with our readers (please note that these are simplified versions of the actual survey questions).

[poll id="2"]

[poll id="3"]

Comments from the Network (2)

  1. Customer Service Buzz » Staff Performance Data Series: What Your Reps Hear
    on June 15, 2011
    Respond

    [...] was left on the “cutting room floor” in our third of three posts in this series (view posts one and [...]

  2. Customer Service Buzz » Staff Data Performance Series: The Rise of the Millennials
    on June 15, 2011
    Respond

    [...] Comment (3) Email  Print This Post TweetCCC conducted a frontline staff skills survey as part of our major research initiative for this year.  As you can imagine, not every interesting data point makes its way into the final product.  Here’s a look at what was left on the “cutting room floor” in our second of three posts in this series (view post one). [...]

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